Case Studies

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We purchased 1700 Euclid St NW in August 2011. On the site at the time was a vacant corner store and a drycleaner. We quickly addressed environmental issues from the drycleaner to efficiently and effectively navigate through a short due diligence period and on to a successful closing. We were able to maximize the development potential and value to the seller through a unique two pod building design and creative unit layouts from our in-house design team. We razed the existing buildings and built a new construction 19 unit boutique condominium that delivered in 2013. The building contained 3 moderate income units through the Inclusionary Zoning program. We worked closely with the Department of Housing and Community Development to develop only the second building in DC to successfully sell these types of units.

Project Info
  • Year Purchased: 2011
  • Year Delivered: 2013
  • Product Type: 19 Condominium Units
  • Inclusionary Zoning: 3 Units
Project Challenges
  • Prior site use left behind environmental issues
  • New regulations required CCRE to be one of first developers ever in Washington, DC to sell IZ units
  • Site restrictions required creative two pod design to maximize site use and design criteria

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We purchased 3220 Grace St, NW in July, 2012. At the time, the site was being used as a parking lot. This property is located in historic Georgetown and with that came numerous building plan restrictions, reviews and required approvals. Several developers had the property under contract previously and proposed plans without success. Even though full approvals had not yet been obtained, we were able to get to a comfort level in the approval process to meet the due diligence timeframe. From there, we successfully closed on the property and were able to obtain all necessary approvals from the Old Georgetown Board, Commission of Fine Arts and DC Historic Preservation Office while working within the zoning requirements for the property. We identified shallow bedrock during our due diligence and were prepared to effectively deal with this imminent issue during construction so as not to effect the overall project. This project has been completed and sold out.

Project Info
  • Year Purchased: 2012
  • Year Delivered: 2015
  • Product Type: 7 Condominium Units
  • Inclusionary Zoning: N/A
Project Challenges
  • Site has legacy of failed development attempts
  • Short due diligence period required
  • Required approvals from OGB, CFA, and HPRB
  • Site work required hand removal of large bedrock due to tight site constraints

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We purchased 1645 31st St, NW (The Williams-Addison House) in May, 2012. It is located in historic Georgetown and is truly a one-of-a-kind property. It was originally built in 1817 and is on the DC Inventory of Historic Sites. At ¾ of an acre, it is one of Georgetown’s largest privately owned estates. The estate had been in disrepair for some time and several developers had attempted to renovate this great property without success. The property was brought to us by a local bank who knew we had the capability to perform on a highly challenging and unique property such as this. We successfully navigated the Old Georgetown Board, the Commission of Fine Arts and DC Historic Preservation Office to receive the necessary approvals to complete the renovation and restoration. We spent two years on a several million dollar renovation and restoration to completely renovate the 11,500 square feet of interior space while restoring and maintaining the exterior and historic features of the 200 year old estate. We worked with acclaimed architect and designer Dale Overmyer on the home and with award winning landscape architect Fritz & Gignoux to make the grounds truly spectacular. This property has been featured in Architectural Digest and on NBC.

Project Info
  • Year Purchased: 2012
  • Year Delivered: 2014
  • Product Type: 11,500 Sq Ft Historic Single Family
  • Inclusionary Zoning: N/A
Project Challenges
  • High-end historic preservation and renovation
  • Home listed on DC Inventory of Historic Sites
  • Legacy of failed redevelopment efforts